“2 Days in the Valley” stars a hot cast that includes Charlize Theron, Jeff Daniels, Danny Aiello, Teri Hatcher, Paul Mazursky, and Glenne Headly. It’s written and directed by John Herzfeld, one whose work I am not familiar with.

The story centers on multiple characters that eventually tie in with each other. We are introduced to each of these characters, one by one, each of them developed very vaguely. The first line of characters that we are introduced to is a slick assassin and a sleazy hitman involved in an insurance scam. Next, a director whose failures as a director have caught up to him and is now suicidal, only if he can find a home for his lovable dog. Then, a crude art dealer with a sweet and innocent assistant. Next, a hot tempered vice police man and his well mannered partner. Finally, two sexy woman who get mixed up in their own scheme.

The film starts off developing it’s characters, which in my opinion, is one of the best ways to start a movie. Without strong characters, the viewers become careless. This crime drama has some very interesting characters that pieced together in the end exceptionally well. It is a film that contains a small amount of black comedy that is overwhelmed by the relentless drama that ensues. This is a good thing. It works much better than adding too much humor and demolishing the action by referring to lame one-liners.

The scene that will grab everyones attention is the exhilarating cat fight between the devilish Charlize Theron and the tough Teri Hatcher. Never before have I seen such a rousing cat fight. “2 Days in the Valley” tries it’s hardest to walk the footsteps of the cult favorite “Pulp Fiction”, but fails to mimic the witty dialog that made “Pulp Fiction” the masterpiece it is. This is still, none the less, an exciting thrill ride from beginning to end. I can’t say that it’s unpredictable because I was never trying to predict it, mainly because I was in a trance.

“2 Days in the Valley” is shocking, edge-of-your-seat entertainment that took me by surprise. Near the end, you will probably find yourself rooting for the sleazy hitman, for he is surprisingly sincere to the ridiculed assistant. The acting was subpar and the script was well written. Even if the dialog lacked some serious wit, it is still somewhat intelligent and has a feel good ending. Spending two days in the valley was an experience I am not likely to forget any time soon.