Shutter Island(2010) directed by Martin ScorseseWhen I heard the idea for Shutter Island, I thought: “A movie with Mark Ruffalo, Leonardo Dicaprio, Jackie Earle Haley, and Ben Kingsley directed by Martin Scorsese? Count me in!” And the film doesn’t disappoint, combining disturbing visuals with an unsuspected twist and a beautiful score. The film starts the two leads(Dicaprio and Ruffalo) are U.S Marshals on Shutter Island trying to solve a missing person’s case in a mental hospital for the criminally insane in the year 1954.Teddy Daniels(Dicaprio) has only just met Chuck Aule(Ruffalo) when they start working the case together, trying to piece together the events that led to the disappearance of a Rachel Solando. They seem to get the run-around by the medical staff, and turn to the inmates for help, who will tell you a lot, but how much of it can you trust? Teddy is having trouble with major migraines and starts to hallucinate, seeing his dead wife, and flashbacks of the war. He knows that Andrew Laeddis, the man responsible for his wife’s death, is in the Hospital and sets out to find him. He doesn’t want to kill Laeddis, but everyone else seems to think otherwise, or that he should reconsider. The further he seems to go into the hospital, the more things seem to be shrouded in mystery. What’s the importance of his flashbacks and dreams? What’s going on in the light-house? Is anybody on his side? And how does he get off the island?The film’s score is really well done. Very simplistic at first, it starts to grow, into a stampede of sound. The first shot of the island is accompanied by deep and rich strings, that develop into much stronger rhythms alongside percussion as the two Marshals head in through the gates of the mental institution. This happens quite often, not always strings, sometimes starting with low percussion, crescendoing, then getting more and more intricate. The music seems almost as if to follow the unraveling mystery, it changes in a way the story changes, sporadic in way, yet following a set path. There’s one moment where the music seems questionable at first, it crescendos, then makes an abrupt halt.  You wonder why the sudden stop, but soon realize it’s intentional, it signifies a twist.Which brings me to my next point, the script. The plot of the film starts off simply(which in a way also mirrors the score):detective solving a case, dealing with past traumas, new partner…okay, got it. But the way the case unravels is rather interesting– somewhat confusing in a way. I doubt that by simply stating there’s a twist, I’d be ruining it for you, all the word of mouth I’d heard about this flick mentioned some sort of twist and I still never saw it coming. I’m not big on the kind of twist, but in Shutter Island I think it really worked. I watched the movie, making sure to hear every important detail, trying to figure it out myself. When I thought I had it figured out, I said it aloud, the movie seemed to confirm my suspicions, then it went on, and it still seemed as though I had it in the bag. I wasn’t really happy with the way the movie was going, it felt like it was a story I had written in middle school, and it just didn’t sit right with me. But still, there was plenty of movie to go, and I wanted to know if I’d cracked the case. Suddenly, there comes a twist, and I didn’t expect it at all(which, with a twist, you’re kinda shooting for). It was much more emotionally gripping, and was much more satisfying, but there’s more than that. The characters carry this new information, start to believe what they’re saying, and the last scene drives it home.I Very much enjoyed Shutter Island. As previously stated, I liked the idea of the cast and crew involved, but when I saw the trailers, I wasn’t exactly going crazy over it. Luckily though, I was pleasantly surprised. the actors do a fantastic job with an already solid script, and the score that mirrors the plot progression just keeps things exciting. The film markets itself as somewhat of a horror/thriller type flick, but it’s much more of a mystery story that’s quite intriguing. So if you get the chance, check this one out.