Julie and Julia Review

Don’t judge a book (or movie), by its cover. Julie and Julia looked like it would turn out to be a pretty boring chick-flick all about cooking, when really, it told two stories, which beautifully intertwined, teach the audience about passion, love, perseverance, and following your dreams. Norah Ephron has directed movies in the past which have turned out alright, (You’ve Got Mail, Bewitched, Michael, Sleepless in Seattle, etc.), and Julie and Julia has the aura of her signature charm all over it. Part of the story is based in New York and the other part in Pairs, and what two better cities for a story so rich in culture and flavour! Starring Meryl Streep (Julia Child), Amy Adams (Julie Powell), Stanley Tucci (Paul Child), Chris Messina (Eric Powell), how could you go wrong? In unhappy, recessionary times as these, this comedy-drama, (with a pinch of romance), is exactly what you need!

Julie and Julia, the movie, follows different parts of the lives of the true and non-fictional characters Julia Child and Julie Powell, both of whom where cooks and writers in their own respective sense. Beginning with Julia Child, we find her recently having moved to Paris, with her husband Paul Child: a government worker. Julia looks for an outlet in which to spend new-found time, and after trying different activities, decides that food and cooking are her true passions. She overcomes prejudice on the part of the cooking school Le Cordon Bleu, and makes friends with two female cooks who happen to be writing a French cook book for Americans without personal chefs. They sign up Julie Child to “American-ize” the book, and they continue to struggle with getting the massive “encyclopedia-like” cookbook published.
Meanwhile as Julia’s story is unveiled in segments, we follow the life of Julie Powell, a former writer and now government employee. Inspired by Julia Child and encouraged by her husband Eric, Julie begins to blog her journey through Julia’s massive cookbook. She plans on cooking all 524 recipes in 365 days. As the year progresses, more drama ensues, and the final climax of both stories draws nearer…but for those you will have to watch the film yourself.

The acting of Amy Adams has continued to amaze me since I saw her in Enchanted, Doubt, and Night at the Museum 2 as Amelia Earhart. What immediately sticks out is her bubbly persona. . Amy has not varied the type of roles she’s played too much, but whenever I see her in a role, it makes me smile to see that someone amongst all the drama in the film, can stay positive, or at least not excessively curse 98% of the time. It almost seems like she belongs in an episode of The Little House on the Prairie, although I disliked that series, but I digress. She has been nominated for 2 Oscars, and will probably be hunting for more in the future, so: Amy Adams: A+.

The writing and directing on the part of Norah Ephron has continued to bring smiles to young and older women, and Julie and Julia is no exception. This is a warning though to hard-blooded, football jocks everywhere. This is not a movie you will enjoy with your friends, or even you by yourself, unless you are in the right state of mind. You have to be upset, having a bad day, etc. to enjoy this movie. If you let it manipulate your mood, kind of like music is used to pump people up, then it can really cheer one up, brightening their day. Yes I had a bad day.

I won’t start or end this conclusion in a cheesy recipe line, partially because they are overrated and partially because I can’t think of one, so just grab your girlfriend and make her happy by taking her to this movie. She’ll laugh, you’ll probably be bored, but hey, at least she’s laughing, and if there is anything Julie Powell and Julia Child have taught the world through this movie, its that support from your partner is key. (Besides perseverance, dreams, yadayada). I dub Julie and Julia: a real classic ladies film!