The thought and idea of bringing forth the possibility of nuclear war is scary, to say the least. Yet, in more recent years, this idea of nuclear war is starting to become a reality. But what could happen if this idea was parodied? Enter the 1964 comedy “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” from director Stanley Kubrick. Long title aside, this movie offers a very comical outlook by taking a very serious subject matter, and poking fun at it. “Dr. Strangelove” is full of dark humor that is still an amazing experience and worth watching to see how something like this would have been made in today’s modern age of political struggle.

The plot is just one crazy moment after another. An army commander goes mad over the fact that the Russians (then called the Soviets) are infiltrating our preciously bodily fluids. So, what does he do? Start a nuclear war, of course! Then, a B-52 plane gets the message, and is ordered to attack Russia, while carrying two nuclear missiles. But the plane’s main target holds a doomsday machine, which will cause enough radiation that will encircle the Earth for over 100 years. The president and his staff members try to stop this attack from happening. And the only person that can offer the most logic in the room is a former Nazi.

“Dr. Strangelove” is a dark political comedy full of creativity. Even though the movie is loosely based on a book, the story is crazy enough to be treated as a serious drama. Yet it pokes fun at the stupidity of the human race and their approach to scientific advancements. The patriotic general (George C. Scott) trying to creative the worst resources available, the cowboy riding a missile to his demise, one cannot help but crack a smile at the stupidity of these characters. Everything else that goes on in the movie is perfect. Stanley Kubrick’s direction is superb as usual, giving the film more of a visual experience than anything else. The acting is incredible, even from our main leads of Scott and Peter Sellers, who, by the way, plays three roles, including the title character. The movie is beautifully shot in black and white, making the cinematography really stand out. Even the sets, including the infamous “war room”, are designed so spectacularly that one has to wonder how everything was accomplished. With this film, it feels like there is nothing negative to say about it at all.

Well, the concept of nuclear war, while still relevant today, has pretty much died down when trying to make a comedy about the subject in question.

In conclusion, “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” is a fantastic comedy from a time when nuclear war actually seemed threatening. Now, it’s pushed off to the side and nobody really cares for it anymore. Thankfully, we have this movie to lighten our spirits.