QUICKary Review: Star Trek is entertaining, and most importantly, a movie that anyone ranging from “I’ve never heard of Star Trek” to full-blown Trekkie can enjoy.

“To boldly reboot like no series has done before” is the mission of Star Trek, and it fairs pretty well. Despite the Star Trek universe being vast and complex, this movie is simple, as it should be. It starts off showing James T. Kirk’s father dying on the U.S.S Kelvin to save the lives of hundreds, including his mom who was pregnant with him at the time. We get to quickly see the bold, cocky Kirk (Chris Pine) as young man preparing to join Starfleet.

The story is basically how the characters of the original Star Trek series came to work together on the U.S.S. Enterprise, and there’s something absolutely refreshing about these young versions of the Enterprise crew. Kirk is joined by Spock (Zachary Quinto), Dr. McCoy (Karl Urban), Uhura (Zoe Saldana), Sulu (John Cho), Chekov (Anton Yelchin) and Scotty (Simon Pegg). Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto dominate the spotlight and bring convincing life to Kirk and Spock. Kirk is arrogant, intelligent and entertaining all at once. I can’t think of a better person to play Spock than Zachary Quinto; as soon as I heard it was him, there was no doubt he would embody everything that is a young Spock.

Not only were the characters interesting to watch, the look and sound of Star Trek are a blast to take in as well. From the score to the visual and sound effects, they all came together as part of an engaging universe. I can’t be the only one who fantasized as a kid about what Star Trek would look like with special effects superior to the ones in the various series we grew up watching.

My only criticism really is the fact that Nero (Eric Bana), the Romulan who wreaks havoc around the universe isn’t that menacing. Sure he’s got a big ship, but he never gives that villain sense. Also, the movie’s humor worked well, but they went overboard with it in parts. It was great in the first half of the movie, but many times during the second half it felt forced or out of place.

Star Trek pays homage to the franchise without going overboard, and will succeed at recruiting a fresh, new audience will re-energizing its loyal fanbase. J.J. Abrams has taken a legendary franchise and made it current, so that it’s enjoyable to even those who have never heard of the Vulcan death grip, or witnessed Captains engage in romantic encounters with green women.