Not sure what I had expected from a heavily star-laced movie, but this is the end provided some of the funniest movie moments for me in over half a decade.

 

“Star-laced” is, sadly, is an understatement for this is the end. It has practically every white comedian from the last 8 years, minus a few (ferrell, wilson, carrell, etc.).   This intentional celebrity-infused ploy doesn’t add much to the funny meter and, in some ways, misuses that potential; however, what it does do well is that it creates the perfect set up for some of the funniest moments in the types of comedy which spawned 40 year old virgin, knocked up, etc.

 

The premise is far-fetched and down-right pathetic–this is not only intentional, but actually increases the humour, incrementally, as the movie progresses.  To safely put it, the world is coming to an end–duh!

There isn’t much else to describe in terms of the plot except that most people die and only a select few make it to the promise land–if it wasn’t mentioned in the trailers, don’t worry, this doesn’t spoil much.

 

The main characters: Franco, Hill, Rogen, Baruschel, McBride and the token black guy from the office are essentially fighting for survival from a biblical demon savagely making his rounds through the now-maimed city of LA.

 

Naturally, the aforementioned cast has all the comedic bells and whistles to make full use of an end-of-the-world setting, all taking place in James Franco’s house.  All the characters play their actual selves and, quite probably, portray some or many non-fictional aspects of their own lives, as well.

 

Baruschel, whose name I’d been pronouncing incorrectly all the while prior, plays the comparatively less-renowned character in this movie.  Along with Seth rogen, however, the duo take up the most screen time by playing best buds in a coming-of-friendship type of side tail.  Franco plays the most-rich-and-successful asshole and Johan Hill plays a complete 180 to what he’s known for.

 

A lot of the movie is centered on vile, self-depricating humour while on psychadellics. The plot, conducively, adds to this mix as you feel it was probably scripted when on said drugs. This is also fine,  because I’d say a fair portion of audience probably is on drugs–or wishes they were.

 

The best moments take place with James Franco and Danny McBride antagonizing each other at key points in the film.

 

Overall, there isn’t much that can be said about This Is The End because there isn’t really a plot; there only lies the interactions the actors/characters share with each other, that further serve to belittle the inferno-ridden society that they’ve helped create–and it’s hilarious!