Untraceable was directed by Gregory Hoblit, who also directed the thriller Fracture. The movie follows an FBI cyber crime unit as they try to stop a new breed of killer. Someone is killing people live on the internet, devising the murders in a way that the more website visits he gets the quicker the victim dies; essentially making curious internet surfers accomplices to murder. The movie stars Diane Lane, Billy Burke, and Colin Hanks.

To start out with: the movie has lots of bad dialog, the actors cannot be to blame for the stale way in which they deliver such lines. However, I was able to push past such things and “go with the flow.” In this way I was able to indeed find entertainment value. The director sets a solid moody tone with darkness and visual shots which were the main thing that kept me into the film regardless of my initially not being impressed with the dialog. The tension and action is built up quite well.

The premise is an intriguing one, which many automatically want to chalk up to as being a gimmick to become preachy on the way society acts towards violence in the new age of internet media and how people will watch snuff films such as beheadings and or suicides  without thinking how this affects the families of the victims. People would visit the killer’s website to see someone die, whether or not they knew he was a good guy with a family. I thought the obvious morality message was not preached too heavily and was handled fairly well.

People who cannot help but pick apart logic flaws, especially computer savvy or chemical savvy folks, will probably not get as much enjoyment out of this movie. Why did the battery acid melt through skin and bone, but not the plastic ties binding his arms? There are lots of liberties taken and unrealistic scenarios. However, if you hop into this ride just looking for some entertainment: it is a worthy rental. The only thing I will caution viewers about though is the gore factor. The deaths in this movie are fairly brutal and gory ala skin getting melted off and such.