Categorized | Drama

Moneyball (2011)

I’m not a big baseball fan. I am not one who’s in love with the game. So when I heard that the movie “Moneyball”, based off the book by Michael Lewis, deals with the business side of baseball, I was quite interested. This movie kept my viewing perspective going to a point where I wasn’t bored. Some people may be turned off by the fact that this baseball movie isn’t all-action, but a more thought-based film that explores how the business side of baseball works. “Moneyball” is a great look at how business with baseball works, despite not having a lot of action.

The plot of the film centers on Billy Beane (Brad Pitt), the General Manager for the Oakland Athletics baseball team. He just lost a very important baseball season, as well as some major players. Mr. Beane acquires a young assistant named Peter Brand (Jonah Hill) who helps Beane with financial player issues. Beane then hires some new talent and the Athletics start doing well. The movie chronicles the Athletics rise and downfall for the 2002 baseball season.

“Moneyball” is a great film that showcases how baseball is conducted. The direction is good, the cast is perfect, and overall, the entire production is flawless. But it’s the story that keeps you interested. Why? Because you want to see what’s going to happen next to the characters, especially Beane who goes through the most trouble in the film. Yes, baseball nerds know what happens, but for those who don’t know about baseball, then, this film is for you.

Like I said, not many people may share the same views like other people about this movie. For people who want to see action in a baseball film, you will not find it here. It mainly talks about the business side of the game.

Overall, “Moneyball” is a great movie about baseball, not showing the game. Sure, some true baseball fans may not appreciate the tone of the film, but it’s enjoyable nonetheless. And as for someone who is not a big fan of the sport, I enjoyed it too.

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