Categorized | Action, Adventure, Comedy, Foreign, Romance

Wild Target-Review

                What do you do with a guy who stops another from killing you? You hire him as a body guard of course.  Victor Maynard (Bill Nighy) is a successful lonely assassin and is perfectly contempt with this type of lifestyle; problem is his is getting older and his mother is pressuring him to find a woman and birth a successor to the family assassin business. Maynard gets a call from his boss for another hit. A woman named Rose (Emily Blunt) who is a con-artist and has recently coned a wealthy paintings collector, Ferguson (Rupert Everett).  After a couple of failed attempts to finish the job, Maynard notices that Ferguson hires another assassin to take out Rose and this is when he saves her. A young man, Tony (Rupert Grint) happens to see what happens and intervenes. Rose hires Maynard-whom she thinks is a private detective- for protection and Maynard finds himself a successor in Tony. They go into hiding as other assassins are sent to take them out. Will they make it past the night? Is this the end for Maynard’s career? Will Rose fall in love with Maynard or Tony?

 

                Review:

                I enjoyed watching this film. I thought it was witty and adventurous. I’ve been a fan of Nighy since “Underworld” I, II and III because his character was always so dramatic; with his weird shouts and tantrums stumps around a room.  It’s sort of the same for this movie; Nighy plays a civilized assassin, who likes thinks kept in order. When Rose toys with his organizational methods, the dramatically emotions erupt out of Maynard and it is comical. I’m a huge Harry Potter fan and seeing Grint in another movie with his fiery hair was a bit weird. Nonetheless, I enjoyed his character of innocence and occasional clumsiness. Blunt’s character was annoying with all of her careless activities but again enjoyable to watch and her character is needed to make the movie work. All in all, I will see this film again.

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