Categorized | Horror, Sci-Fi

Alien (1979)

After waking from hypersleep, seven crew members of the Nostromo deep space mining ship decide to investigate a suspected distress signal coming from a nearby planet. Upon exploration, they discover the remains of an extra-terrestrial space craft. They scavenge the crafts chambers, and what they find is a nesting ground for alien life. After one of the crew members is attacked by an alien hatchling, they bring him back aboard ship and discover the horrors of what they have just uncovered.

“Alien” is the first installment of the now popular science fiction series of film dubbed “Alien Saga”. Released in 1979 and is one of renowned British director Ridley Scott’s early works on the big screen. The film is highly celebrated and was a box-office success, tagging the phrase “In space no one can hear you scream”, and taking science fiction horror to a different high with its iconic alien antagonist and excellent special effects.

Sigourney Weaver stars as Ellen Ripley, an iconic role that won the actress worldwide success and recognition, after starring as the lead role for all four installments of the series (Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection).

Probably my all time favorite science fiction series of film. Its excellent to have relived this after a long time. Ridley Scott’s first installment is a great introduction to the character of Ellen Ripley and the Alien antagonist, as well as a good set-up for the events that are to follow in the next three installments in the series. Nothing really flashy here in terms of action as this was more of the horror scare treatment. The sets are intensely dark and detailed. The flashy lights and strobes add to the tension of the horror that’s lurking around the dark corners of the Nostromo. Every moment is intense and well worth it. A must for every sci-fi enthusiast. A classic scare.

About juanmiguelumali

Manila, Philippines. Media Arts Graduate. Getting high on film...

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